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A baby with a cranial orthotic to improve head shape flatness.

Putting babies to sleep on their backs is preventing sudden infant death syndrome, but it might also be leading to an increase in flat spots on babies' heads.

As reported by NBC News (Nearly half of babies have flat spots, study finds - July 8, 2013), a recent study found that 46.6% of babies had some form of plagiocephaly ("oblique head" or "headshape flatness").

The solution includes varying the side of the head that is placed down when the baby goes to sleep, and also increased "tummy time."

Download Tummy Time Tools for quick tips on how to position, carry, hold, and play with your baby to promote muscle development in the child's neck and shoulders and avoid the development of flat areas on the back of the baby's head.

In an episode of Move Forward Radio, a physical therapist and orthotist discussed treatment and prevention of plagiocephaly, or flat head syndrome.

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